ASRL / PERPETUAL 2014
 
"Alias Man Ray" selected for Art Critics' Award
By Eli Epstein-Deutsch
posted: 03-11-11
Man Ray, Self-Portrait, 1916
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The Jewish Museum's 2009 exhibit "Alias Man Ray: The Art of Reinvention" brought together an unprecedentedly broad spectrum of output by Marcel Duchamp's friend, co-conspirator and occasional portraitist, Man Ray (born Emmanuel Radnitzky). It also contextualized 20th century avant-garde production in relation to the Jewish immigrant experience. The exhibit's different sections catalogued the nomadic wanderings of the man who, much to his chagrin, would become known as the preeminent photographer of Surrealism. It followed his Dada stint in New York as a close ally of Marcel Duchamp in aesthetic rebellion, his move to Paris, and then his flight to Hollywood on the eve of the Fascist takeover. Throughout it demonstrated how Man Ray's profound struggle with the stain of his Jewishness was inextricable from his tactics of erasure, doubling, concealment, cryptography, and other seminal contributions he made to the development of the avant garde and to the postmodern world.

Now "Alias Man Ray" has been selected to win the International Association of Art Critics prize for Best Monographic Museum Exhibition. Mason Klein, the curator who designed and executed the exhibition, will be honored in an award ceremony at Cooper Union on March 14th. Other winning institutions, receiving awards across 12 categories, will include the Neue Galerie, The Institute of Contemporary Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

 

...Source
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Duchamp at the Great Upheaval, Guggenheim
By Jenny Fan
posted: 03-10-11
Apropos of Little Sister, Guggenheim, New York/ADAGP, Paris/Succession Marcel Duchamp
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Guggenheim's new exhibit, "The Great Upheaval: Modern Art from the Guggenheim's Collection" (1910-1918), tries to capture and encapsulate the eclectic and experimental art scenes that permeated Europe at the dawn of the tumultuous 20th century. Among the vanguard of this explosive artistic revolution were artists such as Franz Marc, Piet Mondrian, Vasily Kandinsky, Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp. 
 
Duchamp, in this exhibition, is represented by "Apropos of Little Sister" (1911), a painting that testifies to both his awareness of the artistic movements and their theoretical underpinnings, and his growing anticipation to break away from them.  “Apropos of Little Sister” is, by all means, not a renegade Duchamp.  It did, though, break from his early Impressionist paintings of relaxed brushwork by adjoining the fractured human form (Cubist) to an unstructured background, with a soft Cezanne influenced planar construction in monochromatic palette.  "Apropos" also resembles Jean Metzinger’s tone in “Tea Time” (1911), without the geometric precision. Both Metzinger and Duchamp (for a while) were part of the Puteaux Cubists, who rebelled against the conventional Cubist techniques of Picasso and Braque.  Duchamp, in time, would break away from the Puteaux Cubists and experiment with non optical art.

Concurrent to the Puteaux Cubists was Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), a group formed by Vasily Kandinsky and Franz Marc in late 1911, which is a central focus of the exhibit.  The exhibit takes holdings from the Solomon R. Guggenheim in New York (including the rarely seen Duchamps), as well as the Peggy Guggenheim collection in Venice. "The Great Upheaval: Modern Art from the Guggenheim's Collection, (1910-1918)" is showing through June 1.

...Source
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Looking for Duchamp at the 2011 Armory Show
By Maria Goldverg
posted: 03-09-11

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New York's largest premiere world art fair, The Armory Show, just closed its doors after a truly hectic and overwhelming weekend at Piers 92 and 94. Though the fair has been running every spring since its revival in 1994, this year it hosted a truly gargantuan number of contemporary and modern works exhibited by 274 galleries representing 31 countries from around the world. It was, of course, in 1913 that the original Armory Show, otherwise known as the International Exhibition of Modern Art brought Cubism, and with it Marcel Duchamp, to the eyes of the American public. The show featured Duchamp's Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912), the painting that scandalized the New York art world and made Duchamp an infamous sensation overnight: Teddy Roosevelt famously hated it, and the New York Times condemned the Nude to being an explosion in a shingle factory.

In 2011, though it would have been lamentably easy to overlook a Duchampian gem in a space where all kinds of pantings, sculptures, and installations spanned endlessly in every direction and people streamed through every possible crevice and booth, Duchamp's work was notably absent. His likeness, however, could have been spotted at a booth of modern art in Man Ray's small print, Marcel Duchamp with Nude (1920). Meanwhile, exhibited in the contemporary section at pier 94 by Kavi Gupta, Theaster Gates paid his respects to Duchamp in Whyte Painting (NGGRWR 0014) (2010). The white-porcelain sink basin is part of a series of similar porcelain sink Whyte Paintings that hung beside one another from a white wall. On (NGGRWR 0014), Gates inscribed My Name Goes Here in gold-leaf block lettering. The influence of R. Mutt from Duchamp's Fountain (1917) was transparent as Gates appeared to suggest that Duchamp's legacy simply refuses to wash off, and, in fact, only continues to glisten. There may have been scores of bolder and brighter works than Gates' in the contemporary wing, but his fond and easy parlance with Duchamp resonated for the Armory Show's reincarnation.

Click ...more below for the New York Times review of the show.

...Source
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Found Pop Detritus = Readymade?
By Eli Epstein-Deutsch
posted: 03-08-11
Heavy Metal Parking Lot opens the Found Footage Festival at Largo (in the LA Weekly)
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"Back in 1917, when Marcel Duchamp originated the notion of "found art" by attempting to enter a porcelain urinal into a gallery show as a piece of sculpture, he probably never imagined that someday, hundreds would gather in dark rooms to watch big-haired exercise videos, scary corporate-training films and screamingly unfunny televangelist comedians."

The LA Weekly writer Scott Timberg is right. Why, indeed, is Duchamp's spirit being invoked in conjuction with the odd, voguish habit of plundering an unsecured cache of old VHS tapes from an indie video store, stringing together the cheesiest, most-cringe-inducing clips culled from therein, and presenting the result as a noteworthy cinematic occasion? For this is the activity, staged by a group of Brooklynites around the country, that is being reported in the alternative press as a Duchampian homage.

Now, I was at one of these found footage shindigs (because, believe it or not, I had a grant to study 90's media culture), for research purposes, and thus sober. And I can tell you that there was no artistic transgression involved, no institutional critique, and only the vaguest sense of aesthetic uncanniness, deriving from the fact that, well, people twenty years ago looked like buffoons on TV. The queasy mix of second-hand nostalgia and cheap superiority I experienced through exposure to this phenomenon, I can only assume, was not the intended effect of Duchamp's readymades.

Now, none other than the Roboprofessor is getting into the act with his Duchamp Found Pop Culture Object Theater:

http://kembrew.com/collages/kembrew-presents-the-duchamp-found-pop-culture-object-theater/

What's next? Are these reasonable appropriations of Duchamp's legacy? And am I, therefore, just the sort of culture snob that M.D. was born to annoy? Discuss.

 

 

 

...Source
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Duchamp at the Anatomy/Academy, PAFA
By J. Fan
posted: 03-06-11
Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), Portrait of Dr. Samuel D. Gross (The Gross Clinic), 1875
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Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) in its new exhibition, Anatomy/Academy, in the Fisher Brooks Gallery in PAFA’s Hamilton Building, examines the interface of art and science and its continued role in expanding the frontiers of our knowledge of the human body.  The exhibition centers on the seminal work of scientists, artists and doctors (many of whom were members or affiliates of the school) between the founding of PAFA as the nation’s first art school in 1805 and the end of WWI (1918).  It looks at, for example, the tie between the academy and early French and Italian art academics, Professor Eakin's studies and artistic interpretations of motion photography and sophisticated medical technologies of the era, and new compositions of figurative forms by artists such as Marcel Duchamp.  Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase, No.2 (1912) displayed prominently side by side with Thomas Eakin’s Gross Clinic, for example, shattered the human figure.  The exhibition runs from 1/29 – 4/17.  

...Source
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