ASRL / PERPETUAL 2014
 
Painting with James Hyde and a Weekend at Mount Tremper Arts
By Maria Goldverg
posted: 07-22-11
James Hyde, Swimmer, 2010 at Steven Zevitas Gallery
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Why painting?  Or, what is it exactly about the act of lathering, or perhaps even feathering or spilling, paint upon a surface that has intrigued artists, critics, thinkers, and aesthetes alike for thousands of years?  And whatever that origin may be, does it grip us in the same way today, in our post-Duchampian era of post-post-modernism, as it did 100+ years ago?  The answer, seemingly, is yes.  That is, according to New York artist James Hyde.  

I first encountered Hyde’s work at the opening of Productive Steps, a “little exhibition” curated by Lucas Blalock and Sam Falls at Mount Tremper Arts.  “Aliens in the outhouse?”: I thought about the sculpture piece of an outhouse that enclosed an alien barely visible through the cracks of the structure.  My subsequent thought, “why on earth would they be hiding in here?” felt disturbingly applicable to my impressions of the exhibit as a whole: why on earth were these works of art hiding on a little mountain in the Catskills?  I don’t think I managed to find a suitable answer throughout the evening’s course of pulled pork and performance art pieces.  I strolled by every piece as I would on a holiday, and James Hyde’s was no exception.  In a sense, everybody lounging around Mt. Tremper really was taking a weekend retreat from the blistering New York City summer.  Unfortunately for me and the rest of Productive Steps, Hyde’s work deserved a more attentive audience.

In an interview with Phong Bui of the Brooklyn Rail, Hyde remarked, “I think painting is never entirely about being a painted object, nor a medium in the narrow sense.  I think painting is, as well, a symbolic and allegorical situation that happens to be made by a particular medium and set of materials.”  If Duchamp brought our attention to the “object” of Art—both its object and it as object—then Hyde, it seems, is talking about something quite different.  Something that is, perhaps, more classical at heart, yet infinitely more refreshing: he’s talking about painting being as elementary as a relationship(s).  “I think painting is basically about attaching particles to surfaces,” he explains.  Phong goes on to discuss pieces in which Hyde paints over reproductions of enlarged sections from Stuart Davis’s paintings.  She says of the two components, Hyde’s and Davis’s: “they harmonize and sometimes they collide.”  This is where their beauty lies.  


And this was why I had such a hard time encountering a beautiful experience.  I could only begrudgingly, if amicably, amble about the grounds.  It felt static.  Everybody seemed alarmingly at ease, at rest, in repose and the art seemed to suit this background.  There was little that was harmonizing, and even less that was colliding.  The art simply wasn’t necessary enough in its context and the product left me disenchanted with the experience of it.  But upon reading Hyde’s last words to Phong Bui—“there is something which is so durable and fascinating about painting that I think you can do a lot of paintings about disenchanting painting and still find them quite magical.”—I think, perhaps, I could have paid closer attention, while I had the chance, and not been so preoccupied with thinking about the alien, the show, the work as mere product, i.e. fabricated art object, I could have found in Hyde’s piece an activity—capable of posture, conversation, and, who knows, maybe even an ethics.  The point here is that there is more to notice in painting than aesthetics: there is mobility and potential for transformation, and there is always more to see than meets the eye.    

Below is a link a perfunctory review of “Not About Paint,” an exhibit featuring Hyde’s work at Steven Zevitas Gallery in Boston.

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An Interesting Critique of John Cage
By Eli Epstein-Deutsch
posted: 07-21-11
A deaf person listening to "4'33"
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"Music is sound. Some sounds may be music. Silence is the medium in which sounds and music are expressed. Spare me the next crackpot offering of themes and variations on silence. The deaf have ways of understanding sound and appreciating music. Tell me how you would convey the artisitic merit of silence to the deaf??"

-Justinae, reader/contributor to the London Telegraph.

How indeed could the deaf be made to appreciate "4'33?" A new problem for Cage studies.

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With A Lunatic Gesture We Forsook Jujistsu (Automatism A)
By Eli Epstein-Deutsch
posted: 07-20-11
Robert Motherwell, Automatism A, 1966
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With a lunatic gesture we forsook jujitsu. Etwas unterscheiden zwischen werden Erde gesehen. The politics of underwriting that I have reclaimed, forsooth my shakespearean liege, a league embedded in the first strategy when I set out for champions, however it may have otherwise seemed. When the natives that combined their energies first of all eschewed gentrification, exclaimed that howeverso things might have first seemed to them symbolically, they would absolutely and hirsutely and astutely perservere beyond the bounds of the, we felt a little bit meta at a higher level surveying what was going on it was like several simultaneous streams, polished, mixed in with a need for publicity and a bit of anthracite, a mixture of the abstract and the really really concrete at two separate leveled. And he wondered whether the fact that he wondered whether this made any sense made any sense, when nested between two does distraction really count? Can anyone really write like this? There is a basic incoherency about the the whole process he felt. What about typos? Could invariably the materiality of the signifier not become an issue? Did they ever actually think about that? Or had they actually outthought it in surreality, a true unconscious that always managed to be a step ahead of its own essence, and so avoid the tautological trap of self-conscious referentiality? There is some secret about rhetoric and truth that's mixed up in the goal of absolute transparent uneditorship that any surrealist editor would do wise to try to ignore....invariably looking back to try to proofread now. Typos, types, typos, topos, Greek stream geek dom. The natural bounds that any artwork would assume, with out being, in some sense lazy the reason why text and context just semantic abandon grammar. Funny how that works, like aphasia, degenerate lettrism i o X u g Yum Zum Zum I H ü Yum R T I q Zawp B gzp d x ü

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Secrets of 20th Century Music
By Eli Epstein-Deutsch
posted: 07-19-11
Spike Jones, Sr.
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"One of the things that people don't realize about Dad's kind of music is, when you replace a C-sharp with a gunshot, it has to be a C-sharp gunshot or it sounds awful."

Spike Jonze Jr., as quoted by Thomas Pynchon

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And The Nominees for Le Prix Marcel Duchamp 2011 Are...
By Lucy Li
posted: 07-18-11

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Each year, one French artist is awarded the prestigious Prix Marcel Duchamp. It does not garner quite the media buzz as the Turner Prize does, but the nominees do get a chance to exhibit in the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art of Lille for two months, and the winner will have his or her own exhibition at the Centre Georges Pompidou as well as €35,000 in the bank. This year’s nominees include four impressive artists from very different backgrounds.

Damien Cabanes, a figurative painter and sculptor born in 1959, is arguably the most traditional artist in the group.

Deeparture, 2005

Mircea Canto, born in 1977, is a well-known installation artist represented by galleries in Paris, Tel-Aviv, and Rome.

La Trappe, 2008

Guillame Leblon, born 1971, is another installation artist who works in a variety of media.

Samuel Rousseau, born 1971, is an installation and video artist who works with everything from oil and acrylic paints to taxidermied animal.

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