ASRL / PERPETUAL 2014
 
Can artists create art by doing nothing?
By Andrew Gallix
posted: 06-02-09
Christian Lacroix, 2009
Image Source
More than 20 artists will pay homage to Felicien Marboeuf in an eclectic exhibition opening in Paris next week. Although he's hardly a household name, Marboeuf (1852-1924) inspired both Gustave Flaubert and Marcel Proust. Having been the model for Frederic Moreau, he resolved to become an author lest he should remain a character all his life. But he went on to write virtually nothing: his correspondence with Proust is all that was ever published - and posthumously at that. Marboeuf, you see, had such a lofty conception of literature that any novels he may have perpetrated would have been pale reflections of an unattainable ideal. In the event, every single page he failed to write achieved perfection, and he became known as the "greatest writer never to have written". Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter, wrote John Keats.

Jean-Yves Jouannais, the curator of this exhibition, had already placed Marboeuf at the very heart of Artistes sans Oeuvres (Artists without Works), his cult book that first appeared in 1997 and has just been reprinted in an expanded edition. The artists he brings together all reject the productivist approach to art, and do not feel compelled to churn out works simply to reaffirm their status as creators. They prefer life to the dead hand of museums and libraries, and are generally more concerned with being (or not being) than doing. Life is their art as much as art is their life - perhaps even more so.

Jouannais believes that the attempt at an art-life merger, which so preoccupied the avant garde of the 20th century, originated with Walter Pater's contention that experience, not "the fruit of experience", was an end in itself. Oscar Wilde's nephew, the fabled pugilist poet Arthur Cravan, who kick-started the dada revolution with Francis Picabia before disappearing off the coast of Mexico - embodied (along with Jacques Vache or Neal Cassady) this mutation. Turning one's existence into poetry was now where it was at.

"I like living, breathing better than working," Marcel Duchamp famously declared. "My art is that of living. Each second, each breath is a work which is inscribed nowhere, which is neither visual nor cerebral; it's a sort of constant euphoria." The time frame of the artwork shifted accordingly, from posterity - Paul Eluard's "difficult desire to endure" - to the here and now. Jouannais celebrates the skivers of the artistic world, those who can't be arsed. "If I did anything less it would cease to be art," Albert M Fine admitted cheekily on one occasion. Duchamp also prided himself on doing as little as possible: should a work of art start taking shape he would let it mature - sometimes for several decades- like a fine wine. ...Source

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